Rouen old town

Rouen

Rouen old town is full of half-timbered houses and in general a nice, green city. I cannot remember cities of this size with so many unkilled half-timbered houses. It is all the more surprising that the city had a rather turbulent life (they could have burned or destroyed everything) and a good income (they could have rebuilt everything in stone).

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“Hanging” Valley in Senneville

Nearby hamlet, north of Fecamp, Senneville-sur-Fecamp. I knew that there was access to the sea, but where exactly was not clear. There are no signposts. I pointed my finger at a promising dead end on the navigator.

List of villages with “hanging” valleys can be found on the map of attractions.

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Upper Normandy tourist attractions. 1. Seine-Maritime

Main Upper Normandy tourist attractions are a picturesque Alabaster coast with chalk cliffs. The castles here and there are in most cases not the most outstanding and more like the estates of not too rich nobles. Nice villages with old houses. Calvados and Camembert. Gardens planted by talented gardeners. The beaches are pebbly, in some places at low tide you can find sand, which becomes more in the north.

Map data ©OpenTopoMap

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Fecamp attractions

Fecamp

Feсamp is one of the largest cities on the coast. The next to the south is Le Havre, to the north is Dieppe.

All cities, towns and villages are arranged according to the same principle: high gypsum banks (Alabaster Coast) are cut by a river of greater or lesser strength, a large or small gorge is formed and also an exit to the water, houses grow around this exit. If the river is larger and there are several of them, the exit is wider, and the city is larger. It stretches along its ravines and turns out to be much longer in length than in width.

Further to the north, the shores become lower, the exits to the water are wider and there is more and more sand on the shore, but in Fecamp itself the coast is covered with large pebbles. I think this pebble is poured specifically to protect the port. In smaller cities and less visited places, this pebble is interspersed with sand and, in general, the coast is more pleasant.

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Lower Normandy. Attractions Calvados and Orne on the map

Attractions Calvados deserves a closer look: cider, cheese, calvados, picturesque old towns and trendy resorts nearby – all within daytime road trips. And the beaches are wonderful everywhere. The whole line of beaches is also connected with the history of D Day, for the places of which I give a separate map.

Perhaps few will get to Orne, it is too far from the sea, but it makes sense to study the map of Orne too – maybe you will want to stop there for a couple of days on the way.

Next maps:
North and East – Eure, Seine-Maritime – 1
South and West – Manche
Rouen

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Lower Normandy Map. Manche attractions

We were in Brittany and Upper Normandy, but Lower Normandy remained unexplored for us. Let’s look, what interesting is there and begin with Manche attractions.
The beaches are beautiful and sandy almost everywhere, but Manche has also rocks.

There are two maps in this post.

Lower Normandy. Calvados and Orne. What to visit
Upper Normandy tourist attractions. 1. Seine-Maritime
Rouen old town
Brittany. 1. Ille et Villaine. Saint Malo

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Etretat What to see

Etretat the essence of the Alabaster coast of France, the best of the best. Let’s see what you can see there and how to get to Etretat.

There are many such cozy small resort towns on the Normandy coast. It is to this one that people go to look at the amazingly beautiful white cliffs that form large arches in this place. Famous writers and artists have been here, including Delacroix, Monet, Manet, Offenbach, Dumas, Hugo, Maupassant. There are several paintings by Monet dedicated to Etretat.

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Mont Saint Michel Abbey

According to legend, the St. Archangel Michael appeared to bishop Ober in a dream and ordered to build a church here. And that was done: in the 8th century a chapel appeared on the rock. However, the Archangel Michael is unlikely to have anything to do with the transformation of the chapel into a fortress, which we see today. The place was strategically and economically profitable, and the abbots were smart enough to use it. But the main merit, of course, belongs to those architects from the 11-16 centuries who managed to unit the man-made and nature so poetically.

Writers and not only they admired Mont-Saint-Michel, called it the eighth wonder of the world. At number one, it entered the UNESCO list.

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