Saint Martin Festival Germany. Songs

Last Updated on July 27, 2022

The main children’s autumn holiday is on the way – Sankt Martin Festival in Germany. Processions with lanterns are timed to this holiday.

The memory of Saint Martin is celebrated on November 11th. But processions in his honor usually take place after All Saints’ Day, that is, after November 1, and small processions of one kindergarden or urban area can be scheduled for any day of the last week of October.

All about lanterns: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5

Historically, on this day, there were holidays associated with the end of field work. The workers were looking for a new employer, taxes were paid (tithe, initially in kind, including geese, since in winter it was possible to feed only a limited number of cattle), lease terms and debt payments ended and began. After this day, a 40-day fast began until Christmas, which was then shortened and converted into Advent.

Martin of Tours

Martin of Tours, who is commemorated on November 11, is one of the most important European saints, one of the patron saints of France. Many churches and villages are named after him.

At the age of fifteen, according to the edict on the children of veterans, Martin was forced to take the military oath and served in the emperor’s cavalry for several years. He had to take part in battles with the Gauls.

It was during this period, as he rode along the walls of Amiens, that he met a naked beggar. St. Martin cut off his cloak with his sword and gave half of it to the beggar. That night he saw in a dream Christ, wrapped in half of his cloak. At 18, he was baptized and petitioned to leave the service. But this request was denied to him for a long time, and he was able to leave the service only at the age of 20.

After that, he traveled, visited his parents and persuaded his mother to convert to Christianity. In 361, Martin returned to Poitiers and founded the first monastery in Gaul nearby. He traveled through Gaul, and his travels were accompanied by various miracles.

In 371, the inhabitants of Tours elected him bishop. According to legend, Martin hid from them in the poultry house, and the geese revealed his whereabouts with their noise.

Read more about Tours.

In 397 (or about 400 according to other sources) St. Martin died while visiting one of the villages in his parish.

The veneration of Saint Martin began immediately after his death. It was extremely popular in France. Half of St. Martin’s cloak (cappa Sancti Martini) became a relic of the Merovingian family and accompanied kings everywhere, including in battle, as a relic on which they took an oath. The priest who carried the cappa was called the chaplain; later, all the priests in the army began to be called that. Hence the word chapel – originally a small temporary church for storing relics.

Feasts in honor of the saint

St. Martin has become a hero of various legends, and there are different types of holidays in his honor in many countries.

In German-speaking countries (Germany, partly Switzerland, Austria, partly the Netherlands, partly Belgium) processions with lanterns (Laternenumzug, St-Martin-Umzug, Laternelaufen) take place. Children follow the horseman depicting St. Martin, through the dark streets, then they gather in the square and sing songs dedicated to the feast. The traditional food on this holiday is a goose, and after the procession, children are given figurines of geese or dough men.

Saint Martin German songs

1. Ich gehe mit meine Laterne

An old folk song from Northern Germany. Performance: here

Ich gehe mit meiner Laterne,
und meine Laterne mit mir.
Am Himmel leuchten die Sterne,
hier unten leuchten wir.
Ein Lichtermeer
zu Martins Ehr!
Rabimmel, Rabammel, Rabumm!

Ich gehe mit meiner Laterne,
und meine Laterne mit mir.
Am Himmel leuchten die Sterne,
hier unten leuchten wir.
Der Martinsmann
der zieht voran.
Rabimmel, Rabammel, Rabumm!

Ich gehe mit meiner Laterne,
und meine Laterne mit mir.
Am Himmel leuchten die Sterne,
hier unten leuchten wir.
Wie schön das klingt,
wenn jeder singt!
Rabimmel, Rabammel, Rabumm!

Ich geh’ mit meiner Laterne,
und meine Laterne mit mir.
Am Himmel leuchten die Sterne,
hier unten leuchten wir.
Ein Kuchenduft
liegt in der Luft.
Rabimmel, Rabammel, Rabumm!

Ich geh’ mit meiner Laterne,
und meine Laterne mit mir.
Am Himmel leuchten die Sterne,
hier unten leuchten wir.
Mein Licht ist aus,
ich geh nach Haus.
Rabimmel, Rabammel, Rabumm!

I go with my lantern and my lantern with me.
The stars are shining in the sky, and we are shining down here.
Sea of ​​light in honor of St. Martin!

I go with my lantern and my lantern with me.
The stars are shining in the sky, and we are shining down here.
Martin’s man is ahead of us

I go with my lantern and my lantern with me.
The stars are shining in the sky, and we are shining down here.
How wonderful it sounds when everyone is singing!

I go with my lantern and my lantern with me.
The stars are shining in the sky, and we are shining down here.
The smell of the pie floats in the air

I go with my lantern and my lantern with me.
The stars are shining in the sky, and we are shining down here.
My lantern went out, I’m going home

2. Laterne, Laterne

Folk song. Only one verse is known, but they often add something to it, so this song turns out to be long on discs. performance

Laterne, Laterne,
Sonne, Mond und Sterne.
Brenne auf mein Licht,
brenne auf mein Licht,
aber nur meine liebe Laterne nicht!

Lantern, lantern.
Sun, moon and stars.
Light up, my light, light up, my light, only my dear lantern – no!

3. Sankt Martin

A folk song-ballad that tells the story in detail. Performance

Sankt Martin, Sankt Martin. Sankt Martin
Ritt durch Schnee und Wind,
Sein Ross das trug ihn fort geschwind.
Sankt Martin ritt mit leichtem Mut
Sein Mantel deckt ihn warm und gut.

Im Schnee saß, im Schnee saß,
im Schnee da saß ein armer Mann,
Hat Kleider nicht, hat Lumpen an.
“Oh helft mir doch in meiner Not
sonst ist der bittre Frost mein Tod”

Sankt Martin, Sankt Martin,
Sankt Martin zieht die Zügel an,
Sein Ross steht still beim armen Mann.
Sankt Martin mit dem Schwerte
Teilt den warmen Mantel unverweilt.

Sankt Martin, Sankt Martin,
Sankt Martin gibt den halben Still,
Der Bettler rasch ihm danken will.
Sankt Martin aber ritt in Eil
Hinweg mit seinem Mantelteil.

St. Martin, St. Martin. St. Martin galloped through the snow and wind.
His horse quickly carried him forward.
St. Martin rode boldly, his cloak was warm and covered him well.

He sat in the snow, sat in the snow,
one poor man sat in the snow, without a dress, in rags.
“Oh, help me in my trouble, otherwise there will be a severe frost for my death!”

St. Martin, St. Martin, St. Martin pulled on the reins,
his horse stood beside the poor man.
St. Martin immediately cut his warm cloak with his sword.

St. Martin, St. Martin, St. Martin gave half of the cloak,
the beggar rushed to thank him.
But St. Martin rode off in a hurry, with his half of his cloak.

4. Durch die Strasse, auf und nieder

Performance: here
text Lieselotte Holzmeister, music Richard R. Klein (mid-20th century)

Durch die Straßen auf und nieder
leuchten die Laternen wieder.
Rote, gelbe, grüne, blaue.
Lieber Martin, komm und schaue!

Wie die Blumen in dem Garten
blühn Laternen aller Arten.
Rote, gelbe, grüne, blaue.
Lieber Martin, komm und schaue!

Und wir gehen lange Strecken
mit Laternen an den Stecken.
Rote, gelbe, grüne, blaue.
Lieber Martin, komm und schaue!

The lanterns are shining again along the streets, above and below.
Red, yellow, green, blue.
Dear Martin, come and see!

Lanterns of all sorts bloom like flowers in a garden.
Red, yellow, green, blue.
Dear Martin, come and see!

And we walk for a long time, with lanterns on sticks.
Red, yellow, green, blue.
Dear Martin, come and see!


5. Kommt, wir wolln Laterne laufen. Rolf Zuckowski

Finally, modern song with a beautiful melody, but difficult for children to sing. Nevertheless, educators often sing it.
Performance Zuckowski first sings the introduction, which, of course, is not sung in the street.

Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, zündet Eure Kerzen an
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, Kind und Frau und Mann
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, das ist unsere schönste Zeit
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, alle sind bereit
Hell wie Mond und Sterne leuchtet die Laterne
Bis in weite Ferne übers ganze Land.
Jeder soll uns hören, kann sich gern beschweren
Diese frechen Gören das ist allerhand

Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, heute bleibt das Fernsehn aus
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, keiner bleibt zu Haus
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, denn wir fürchten nicht die Nacht
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, das wär doch gelacht
Hell wie Mond und Sterne leuchtet die Laterne
Bis in weite Ferne übers ganze Land.
Jeder soll uns hören, kann sich gern beschweren
Diese frechen Gören das ist allerhand

Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, bis das letzte Licht verglüht
Kommt wir wolln Laterne laufen, singt mit uns das Lied
Hell wie Mond und Sterne leuchtet die Laterne
Bis in weite Ferne übers ganze Land
Jeder soll uns hören, kann sich gern beschweren
Diese frechen Gören das ist allerhand

Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, light up the lights.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, children, women and men.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, this is our best time.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, we are all ready.
A lantern shines bright as the moon and stars
To the very edge of the whole earth.
Everyone should hear us, can, of course, complain
“These sassy kids are everywhere!”

Come on, we want to walk with lanterns , the TV is off today.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns , no one will be at home.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, we are not afraid of the night.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns , that would be funny.
A lantern shines bright as the moon and stars
To the very edge of the whole earth.
Everyone should hear us, can, of course, complain
“These sassy kids are everywhere!”

Come on, we want to walk with the lanterns before the last light goes out.
Come on, we want to walk with lanterns, sing a song with us.
A lantern shines bright as the moon and stars
To the very edge of the whole earth.
Everyone should hear us, can, of course, complain
“These sassy kids are everywhere!”

Holidays and traditions in Germany – #culture #traditions
All about flashlights – #diy

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